Spoons: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

Cataloging my whittling efforts. From sanded lime/bass wood, to faceted hard wood.

Spoon 10: Local Ash

Ash from a local clough, walnut oil.

First spoon with my new deep curve Hans Karlsson crook knife, a gift from my mother-in-law for my 40th birthday.

Spoon 9: Local Ash

Ash from a local clough, walnut oil.

For my sister.

Spoon 8: Local Ash

Ash from a local clough, walnut oil.

A gift for my mum.

Spoon 7: Accidental slotted spoon

Another branch from the garden, walnut oil.

Different shrub, with darker wood. The pith was right at the base of the bowl and created a hole, luckily it was dead centre and my wife suggested adding more holes to make a small slotted spoon. I've also now got a branding iron.

Spoon 6: A 3rd weaning spoon

Unknown shrub branch, sealed with walnut oil.
Final spoon from this branch, the pith is small and hard enough not to be a problem, while whittling I changed tack to make it a feature.

Spoon 5: Another weaning spoon

Unknown shrub branch, sealed with walnut oil.
Using a branch from the same shrub as Spoon 4, chopped down last year in our back garden. This spoon is a gift for a friend who's expecting her second child. The aim with this spoon was to start and finish in the same day. I initially left some bark on the handle, but decided it looked tacky. I've also not sanded the outside of the bowl, leaving the knife cut facets (see Robin Wood on sanding vs not-sanding)

Spoon 4: Weaning spoon for my daughter

Unknown shrub branch, sealed with walnut oil.
Made for my newborn daughter. Much harder wood than lime, more effort to carve but the harder wood feels much nicer to work with. Lovely elegant lines, but made over a good few days. Finally got some finer grained paper, worked down from coarse to fine to help stop the spoon becoming furry with use (see Robin Wood):

Spoon 3: Another offcut

Lime wood with milk paint handle, sealed with walnut oil.
As below. Same style small spoon using a lime wood offcut. Idea was to experiment with when to apply the milk paint, pre or post sealing with walnut oil. Result is clear, it's better to apply the oil first, paint later. Sanded down the grainy milk paint to see what the finish would be like.

Spoon 2: Offcut experiment

Lime wood with milk paint handle, sealed with walnut oil.
Practise making use of a little offcut of Limewood, not a very elegant result. Suffered from same coarse sanding issues as Spoon 1, and same problem with unclean cuts from the hook knife in the bowl. Shown below with Spoon 1:

Spoon 1: Ladle

Lime wood with milk paint handle, sealed with walnut oil.
First spoon attempt. Good size and shape, but the pleasant shape was from sanding over poor cuts with coarse building sandpaper. Bowl has some unclean cuts with unsanded fibre ends that absorb more oil and give the look of a dirty patch. Using coarse builders sandpaper has left a furry surface. Milk paint didn't mix well and was very lumpy, but it dried leaving a really nice textured finish (I hope I can repeat the happy accident again).